Car & Classic Dealer

Frank Dale and Stepsons Ltd

Unit 11, Trafalgar Way, Sandhurst

GU15 3BN

  02080334905

Frank Dale and Stepsons Ltd

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  • During the late 1920s and early 1930s Bentley ran into grave financial trouble and by 1931 Rolls-Royce had stepped in and bought the assets and goodwill of the defunct company and formed a new one, Bentley Motors (1931) Ltd. Rolls-Royce had considered the Bentley marque to be a growing threat to their future success, but following their purchase decided to continue the Bentley name, albeit under their own stewardship, taking the company in an entirely new direction with the creation of the Silent ...

    London
  • The S1 Continental engine had effectively run its course by 1959 and could not be developed any further. The approximate 160bhp power output was more than sufficient but due to pressures and competition elsewhere Rolls-Royce sought out an improved power unit to deliver more speed whilst retaining the Bentley Continentals refined performance. The answer was a complete move away from the six cylinder inline engine configuration, to an all new V8 engine boasting 6,230cc and an estimated 200bhp boosting ...

    London
  • During the late 1920s and early 1930s Bentley ran into grave financial trouble and by 1931 Rolls-Royce had stepped in and bought the assets and goodwill of the defunct company and formed a new one, Bentley Motors (1931) Ltd. Rolls-Royce had considered the Bentley marque to be a growing threat to their future success, but following their purchase decided to continue the Bentley name, albeit under their own stewardship, taking the company in an entirely new direction with the creation of the Silent ...

    Surrey
  • During the late 1920’s and early 1930’s Bentley ran into grave financial trouble and by 1931 Rolls-Royce had stepped in and bought the assets and goodwill of the defunct company and formed a new one, Bentley Motors (1931) Ltd. Rolls-Royce had considered the Bentley marque to be a growing threat to their future success, but following their purchase decided to continue the Bentley name, albeit under their own stewardship, taking the company in an entirely new direction with the creation of the ...

    London
  • 1962 saw the introduction of the Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud III which was to be the final variant of the factory bodied standard steel saloon. At first glance it would appear that the all new Silver Cloud III was merely a Silver Cloud II with different headlamps. The introduction of the twin headlamps was clearly the most obvious change, but the differences did not end there. Further changes included the introduction of smaller bumper over riders and the repositioning of the front indicators and side ...

    Surrey
  • 1959 was an important year in the history of Rolls-Royce and Bentley when looking at the mechanical development of the companies. The series one engine had effectively run its course by this point and could not be developed any further. The approximate 160bhp output was more than sufficient but due to pressures and competition elsewhere Rolls-Royce sought out an improved power unit to deliver more speed whilst retaining the refined performance. The answer was a complete move away from the six cylinder ...

    London
  • The Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud I engine had effectively run its course by 1959 and could not be developed any further. The approximate 160bhp power output was more than sufficient but due to pressures and competition elsewhere Rolls-Royce sought out an improved power unit to deliver more speed whilst retaining the refined performance. The answer was a complete move away from the six cylinder inline engine configuration, to an all new V8 engine boasting 6,230cc and an estimated 200bhp, boosting the ...

    41,000
    Surrey
  • The Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud I engine had effectively run its course by 1959 and could not be developed any further. The approximate 160bhp power output was more than sufficient but due to pressures and competition elsewhere Rolls-Royce sought out an improved power unit to deliver more speed whilst retaining the refined performance. The answer was a complete move away from the six cylinder inline engine configuration, to an all new V8 engine boasting 6,230cc and an estimated 200bhp, boosting the ...

    Surrey
  • Claude Johnson, the business genius at Rolls-Royce was somewhat of a visionary and saw the future potential of the American car market long before production began of Rolls-Royce motor cars in the United States. Following much persuasion by Johnson, C.S. Rolls set foot on American soil for the first time in the autumn of 1906. His brief but eventful stay in America included a meeting with the famous Wright Brothers, who he was later to forge a strong friendship with. It also included his 20 horse ...

    Surrey
  • The tremendous success Bentley enjoyed with the R Type Continental continued onto the S Series chassis in late 1955 with a range of new bodies available to collectors. The Park Ward fixed head coupe and drophead coupe designs on the R Type Continental chassis were originally the brain child of legendary coachwork designer John Blatchley who had been involved in the styling of the R Type Continental by H.J. Mulliner. Six R Type Continental chassis were delivered to the Park Ward works, which were ...

    London
  • Frank Dale & Stepsons have relocated to Sandhurst in Surrey where our 14,000 square foot workshop offers the very best support to Rolls-Royce and Bentley owners. We offer:- Highly competitive pricing, with servicing on all pre-war models charged at £65 per hour, servicing on all post war models built up to 2003 charged at £75 per hour and servicing on all models built from 2004 onwards charged at £85 per hour. Our diagnostic equipment enables us to service and work on all modern Rolls-Royce ...

    Surrey
  • 1962 saw the introduction of the Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud III which was to be the final variant of the factory bodied standard steel saloon. At first glance it would appear that the all new Silver Cloud III was merely a Silver Cloud II with different headlamps. The introduction of the twin headlamps was clearly the most obvious change, but the differences did not end there. Further changes included the introduction of smaller bumper over riders and the re positioning of the front indicators and ...

    Surrey
  • Bentley launched the new S3 Continental in October 1962. Its predecessor, the S2 Continental, had benefitted from technical innovation with the introduction of the V8 configured engine – moving on from the straight 6 cylinder configuration of the original S1 Continental. The S3 was given a further boost in power with larger 9.1 compression ratio carburettors, improved power steering to aid movement at parking speeds and a Lucas vacuum-advance distributor to aid fuel consumption. Aesthetically, ...

    Surrey
  • 1962 saw the introduction of the Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud III which was to be the final variant of the factory bodied standard steel saloon. At first glance it would appear that the all new Silver Cloud III was merely a Silver Cloud II with different headlamps. The introduction of the twin headlamps was clearly the most obvious change, but the differences did not end there. Further changes included the introduction of smaller bumper over riders and the re positioning of the front indicators and ...

    London
  • Frank Dale & Stepsons have relocated to Sandhurst in Surrey where our 14,000 square foot workshop offers the very best support to Rolls-Royce and Bentley owners. We offer:- Highly competitive pricing, with servicing on all pre-war models charged at £65 per hour, servicing on all post war models built up to 2003 charged at £75 per hour and servicing on all models built from 2004 onwards charged at £85 per hour. Our diagnostic equipment enables us to service and work on all modern Rolls-Royce ...

    Surrey
  • 1962 saw the introduction of the S3 variant of the factory bodied standard steel saloon and at first glance it would appear that the all new S3 was merely an S2 with different headlamps. The introduction of the twin headlamps was clearly the most obvious change, but the differences did not end there. Further changes included the introduction of smaller bumper over riders and the repositioning of the front indicators and side lamps into one single unit on the front wing, resulting in an arguably ...

    London
  • The decision was taken in 1950 to develop a Bentley motor car capable of producing high maximum speeds ideal for Continental touring on the long straight roads of Europe. The higher speeds were to be coupled with correspondingly high rates of acceleration and excellent handling. In order to achieve these lofty ambitions a tremendous amount of research and testing were conducted using quarter scale models in the Hucknall wind tunnel. Extensive testing and alterations allowed Ivan Evernden and John ...

    London
  • The tremendous success Bentley enjoyed with the R Type Continental continued onto the S Series chassis in late 1955 with a range of new bodies available to collectors. The Park Ward fixed head coupe was originally the brain child of legendary coachwork designer John Blatchley who had been largely responsible for the styling of the R Type Continental by H.J. Mulliner. Six R Type Continental chassis were delivered to the Park Ward works who were then owned by Rolls-Royce. Blatchley was given the task ...

    London
  • From late 1906 onwards Rolls-Royce Ltd began production of their 40/50hp which later became known as the Silver Ghost. The London Motor Show at Olympia in November of 1906 heralded its introduction to the motoring world and by the spring of 1907 the first batch of deliveries were met. The leading coach makers of the time were familiar with being provided with the under carriage from the manufacturers and constructing a body to suit their customers’ requests. Rolls-Royce continued with this tried ...

    Surrey
  • The tremendous success Bentley enjoyed with the R Type Continental continued onto the S Series chassis in late 1955 with a range of new bodies available to collectors. The Park Ward drophead coupe was originally the brain child of legendary coachwork designer John Blatchley who had been involved in the styling of the R Type Continental by H.J. Mulliner. Six R Type Continental chassis were delivered to the Park Ward works, which were then owned by Rolls-Royce. Blatchley was given the task of styling ...

    London
  • By 1960 H.J. Mulliner had been acquired by Rolls-Royce. H.J. Mulliner were entrusted with the creation of the closed body styles on the Continental chassis with Rolls-Royce turning to the experts at Park Ward, who had been owned by Rolls-Royce since before the war, to provide the styling and construction of the future open variants in the Bentley Continental range. Whilst at the Turin Motor Show, some of the Rolls-Royce hierarchy had been impressed with the styling of an Alfa Romeo coupe created ...

    Surrey
  • 1962 saw the introduction of the Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud III which was to be the final variant of the factory bodied standard steel saloon. At first glance it would appear that the all new Silver Cloud III was merely a Silver Cloud II with different headlamps. The introduction of the twin headlamps was clearly the most obvious change, but the differences did not end there. Further changes included the introduction of smaller bumper over riders and the re positioning of the front indicators and ...

    London
  • The decision was taken in 1950 to develop a Bentley motor car capable of producing high maximum speeds ideal for Continental touring on the long straight roads of Europe. The higher speeds were to be coupled with correspondingly high rates of acceleration and excellent handling. In order to achieve these lofty ambitions a tremendous amount of research and testing were conducted using quarter scale models in the Hucknall wind tunnel. Extensive testing and alterations allowed Ivan Evernden and John ...

    London
  • 1959 was an important year in the history of Rolls-Royce and Bentley when looking at the mechanical development of the companies. The series one engine had effectively run its course by this point and could not be developed any further. The approximate 160bhp output was more than sufficient but due to pressures and competition elsewhere Rolls-Royce sought out an improved power unit to deliver more speed whilst retaining the refined performance. The answer was a complete move away from the six cylinder ...

    London